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not to raise taxes. that promise, that pledge, the brain child of anti-tax activist grover norquist, a long-time power broker in the gop. but the vote faced its first test last week when senator saxby chambliss said he was ready to break the promise. congressman king -- now senator lindsey graham has become the latest republican to say he would violate the pledge if democrats also showed willingness to rein in the nation's debt. >> i want to buy down debt and cut rates to create jobs. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country. only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >>> >> let's bring in cnn political editor paul steinhauser. three republican lawmakers. it's not exactly a rebellion, right? >> not a rebellion yet. grover norquist, carol, was on cnn on "starting point" just an hour ago. he said you know what? if any of these lawmakers do make the pledge they have explaining to do to their voters. take a listen. >> if you want to go to your voters and say i promised you this and i'm breaking my promise, you can have that conversation with them. but you don'
to the pledge i know you signed with grover norquist. he said i'm okay with closing loopholes, but it has to be revenue neutral. but everyone knows to get a deal done, it can't be neutral. are you open to a deal that is not revenue neutral? >> what i'm open to is the idea of acknowledging the fact that we can bring in on average 18.5% of gdp through our revenue stream. that's what our tax system is capable of doing in the united states. that remains a constant. whether or top rate is at 35% as it is now or 75% as it was back in the early 1980s. that's a relative concept. what i want is for us to produce a steady stream of 18.5% rather than having these peeks and valleys. last year, we had a valley of about 14.5%. other years, closer to 20%. we want a steady, even, 18.5%. >> but to get from 14.5 to 18.5 is not revenue neutral. >> to get to there is not revenue neutral in the immediate sense, but what i'm saying is that if it produces on average 18% of gdp and that's going to keep us constant, that is arguably revenue neutral. in the long run, i think everyone would benefit. it would be rev
for americans for tax reform and the zealot could be pumped. grover norquist himself on what appears to be a revolt on the right, half dozen republican senators would have disown add pledge that isn't feasible now including oklahoma senator coburn, arizona's john mccain, south carolina's graham, idaho's crapo, tennessee's alexander, and georgia's sam bliss. it is not that they have all become antipledge, more like, well, antisweeping pledge. particularly the party of that pledge that called for resisting any move to end any tax break. to hear georgia's chambliss, too rigid, too inflexible, noting times have changed significantly, and i care more about my country than i do about a to-year-old pledge. if so, so what now? norquist in a second, to bob on republicans increasingly happy to make grover the grinch. what do we make of this? what is going on? >>guest: republicans lost the election. it was about tax policy. most republicans want to get a deal they have to give something up. they will want something in run so if they bend on taxes they will want an entitlement reform, so, that i
d.c. journal the hill." let's do a little refresher. who is grover norquist, talk to me about this pledge. it is not just about raising taxes, is it not? >> it is not just about raising taxes. this is a pledge that is spearheaded by activist grover norquist, a popular figure on the right and he basically is -- most members but not all members of congress on the republican side to sign this pledge which basically says they're not going to increase tax rates and also if they close deductions they would use that money to lower taxes in another area. after seeing republicans break, where they're saying, listen, we're willing to close tax loopholes to reduce the deficit, now we haven't yet seen that from congressional republican leaders, but we obviously are seeing it from prominent republicans you showed including senator graham and senator bob corker. >> question about two of those gentlemen here in a moment. cnn this morning talked to grover norquist, incumbents dare to break this pledge, dare to vote to raise taxes. the question was will he do it again? here's norquist. >> we w
spearheaded by grover norquist. it's proving to be a more complicated position for house gop leaders including eric cantor who gave this answer when asked about norquist's pledge earlier today on morning joe. >> when i go to the constituents that have re-elected me, it is not about that pledge. it really is about trying to sa solve problems. >> joining me now is. >> domenico montanro. the statement that eric cantor saenlt september to us or his office sent to us, they're still not for tax rates going up. they're okay. the difference is if you're going to be for revenue, the norquist pledge says that you have to have equal tax cuts to offset, that in other words, keep government like norquist likes to say in the bathtub. he doesn't like it to get too big. i think in that way you might see some republicans violate that pledge but i think it's a muj harder pledge to get them to agree to an increase in tax increases like the president wants. >> you guys in the first read team, political team at msnbc point out that it would allow effective tax rates to rise for the wealthy without raising the tax
. >> steve: grover norquist has hundreds of republicans to do that. clearly with the fiscal cliff comment and automatic spending cuts and taxes go up on everybody. something has to be done. the feeling is that it will happen two now. republicans have beenadament and said we can't raise taxes on anybody. and glover norquist said as long as you don't raise tax rates that is okay. and lindsay graham on that. >> i agree we shouldn't raise rates but i think grover is wrong to cap and buy down debt. what do you do with the money and i will violate the pledge for the good of the country only if the democrats do entitlement reform. >> gretchen: i think the pledge thing is good and bad. if you are a republican and believe that raising taxes is the wrong they think that and fine. but ham stringing politicians and many people lost election over there and turns out times change. peter king is also saying he's going to go against the pledge who agreed to it years and years and his reasoning that times have changed. here is the caviat . you are a republican and don't want to raise taxes and willing to
. that pledge pushed by the conservative activist, grover norquist, has been part of republican orthodoxy for several years which makes statements like these so surprising. listen -- >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country, only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware, i was just elected, that will only thing i'm honoring is the oath that i served. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. >> when i go to the constituents that have reelected me, it is not about that pledge. >> eric cantor, the majority leader in the house of representatives. joining us now, kevin mccarthy, the majority whip, the number three republican leader in the house of representatives. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >> are you ready to jump on that bandwagon and violate that grover norquist pledge? >> i think what the american people want is to see the problem solved. what we have, we spend more than $1 trillion more than we bring in every year. we have to solve that problem
republicans. a lot are saying they will violate grover norquist's no tax pledge. >> this pledge goes back to 1986 and you're now seeing some republicans saying no i'm going to break this pledge. lindsey graham from south carolina, the most recent saxby chambliss did it the other day. those republicans senators up for re-election in 2014. maybe they'll face a challenge from the right. take a look at what lindsey graham said on the sunday talk shows. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid the coming grief, and republicans, republicans should put revenue on the table. we're this far in debt, we don't generate enough revenue. >> and that's his key difference here. he says he's okay with the no taxes but we do need to raise revenues and if that means cutting back on such things as tax rates, he will do it. also he says the democrats have to come forward here, as well. they have to do entitlements if he's going to break his pledge. zoraida? >> paul steinhauser live in washington for us. thank you. >> we're in the midst of the shopping f
that man's pledge, americans for tax reform president grover norquist who has hundreds of republicans signed. >> do you feel you are under assault? >> no. it allows elected officials to make it clear openly to voters where they stand. are they going to be able to perform in government of raising taxes. >> reporter: norquist's threat that he will help fund republican campaign challenges against those who violate the pledge. >> what i think i hear you saying, we won't go over. >> i think we will continue the tax cuts. not raise taxes $500 billion. >> reporter: while norquist tries to keep republicans in line -- >> protecting medicare, medicare and education from cuts -- >> reporter: major unions have spent millions targeting democrats, hoping to stop the program. congressional staffers met over the holiday week and leaders hope to meet with the president in the coming week. there are predictions it could be wrapped up before christmas. we'll see. >> david kerley, thank you. >>> we are going to turn overseas and a scene of horror. a clothing factory that went up in flames. the workers tr
increases of any kind, period. behind it all, this man, grover norquist, considered one of the most powerful men in washington. since he worked for ronald reagan in the 1980s, he's gotten virtually every elected republican to sign a pledge promising no tax increases. >> a taxpayer-friendly congress. >> reporter: they sign it to help get elected and don't violate it for fear of getting hammered for breaking their word. now how many of these things have been signed? >> pledges? >> reporter: yes. >> thousands over the years. >> reporter: he keeps them all on file. here's john boehner's pledge signed 20 years ago. if somebody signed this 10 years ago or 18 years ago, 20 years ago, are they still bound by it? >> now when you got married, did your wife understand there was an expiration date on that promise? when you borrowed money to buy your house, did you say, "oh geez, that mortgage? that was ten years ago. you're still asking me for money?" you know, if you make a commitment, you make a commitment. >> reporter: the pledge is the biggest obstacle to any deal that would raise taxes, but with a
technically that goes against grover norquist's pledge. >> well, we've already put a plan out in the budget committee. as you said, i am a part of that budget committee. and we put out the fundamentals of that, where we would have a plan where we would have pro-growth tax reform, and that means something fairer, flatter and simpler, and a portion of that is to look at the deductions that right now really do benefit those in the upper income, and that we're willing to look at those, and to make sure that what we do does bring in more revenue by robust economy. >> and it wouldn't be a violation of a sort of a marriage vow to grover norquist. he has said that violating his pledge is somehow akin to, you know, violating your marriage vows. you don't -- your deal is with your constituents, not with grover norquist? >> that's right. that's exactly right. >> i want to talk a little bit about the debt ceiling because this is coming into play here. grover norquist, again, has written an op-ed mentioning the debt ceiling specifically. a new report for the bipartisan policy center said the ceiling mus
the political risks that come with it. the "no new taxes" pledge is the brainchild of grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. >> what the pledge does, of course, allows elected officials to make it clear openly to the american voters where they stand. >> reporter: norquist may not be a household name outside the belt kwai, but here in washington he carries significant weight as evidenced by the hundreds of republican lawmakers who have signed his pledge over the years. even as top republicans signal they are willing to compromise there is still a catch. the white house indicated everything is part of the discussion. >> all three legs of this will have to be part of it. >> reporter: president obama has tapped treasury secretary tim geithner to lead negotiations on these fiscal cliff talks. rob and paula, back to you. >> both sides are going to have to give a little. both sides. should be interesting. the president now trying to make a public push. he's meeting with business leaders to try to sell this plan. the white house warning closer and closer, the average family will pay $2,
from grover norquist's group, the anti-tax crusader, and his group americans for tax reform have asked republicans over the years to promise to oppose any effort to raise taxes in any way. now, just this past week, we heard from georgia senator republican saxby chambliss saying, for the love of his country he'd be willing this oppose this years-old pledge because if you stick to it it will make it much more difficult to reach agreement on the debt. today we heart from senator lindsey graham and peter king, congressman out of new york, also jumping on the bandwagon with that. let's listen to that. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece. and republicans should put revenue on the table. i want to buy down debt and cut rates to create jobs but i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> agree entirely. a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago, is for that congress. fy were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the declaration of
are attacking grover more gift. grover -- grover norquist. one side is going to win because it's united, highly aggressive and reckless. >> they said they would reform entitlements later -- >> come on ... martha: later? how many things have we said we are going to do later? it's so ridiculous it makes you want to jump over the fiscal cliff. in terms of raising the debt limit again. let me put this out there. the reason for that is they don't want to go through this exercise of talking about spending cuts. >> the other part of what i was going to say many democrats want to reform entitlements as long as it doesn't hurt beneficiaries. if you are going to talk to me about tax raising. we are talking about the bush clauses, the bush taxes which are supposed to end after 9 years because they knew there would be huge deficits after that. >> this is not even serious. everybody agrees taxes are going up. taxes are going up on rich people period. the real question is how are you going to pull back on spending? we have a debt larger than our economy because of spending, specifically medicare spending. th
grover norquist and a bleng pledge. i don't believe that is a driving force for house republicans. they don't think it's good in the economy to race taxes on those who create jobs. >> president obama said that in 2010 right after the mid term beating the busheir raw tax cuts were set to expire and he extended them. a financial expert taking on the president's plan and what it may do for this country. >> it is uncertainty in the short term. a worse scenario long-term than going over the cliff would be continuing on this path more spending more redistribution. it has to be fixed. kicking the can down the road as the saying goes. i think even if we got a resolution which didn't suit the republicans for example you would probably see some up tick in the economy. what we are seeing now is economic leaththargy. how can they look 30 years down the line when our own government can't even look a couple weeks. >> republicans say there needs to be structural reform to the entitlements. nance is he pelosi is saying what does that mean? >> move the age down. >> perhaps. but they haven't really
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)